CONDO is a collaborative exhibition by 46 galleries across 17 London spaces between 13 January — 10 February 2018. Condo takes its name from ‘condominium’ and is a large-scale collaborative exhibition of international galleries. Host galleries share their spaces with visiting galleries – either by co-curating an exhibition together, or dividing their galleries and allocating spaces. The initiative encourages the evaluation of existing models, pooling resources and acting communally to propose an environment that is more conducive for experimental gallery exhibitions to take place internationally.

Like A Little Disaster is proud to present “Risky Attachments”, a new collective project involving works by Andreas Ervik, Lara Joy Evans, Lauren Gault, Thomas Hämén, Jocelyn McGregor, Plasticity, Rustan Söderling, Ittah Yoda. L.A.L.D. is also very happy to present “Risky_Attachements / The_Guidebook”, an analog/ digital publication including interventions and contributions by all artists involved in the show + Penny Rafferty, Sebastian Rozemberg, Ferdinando Boero, Christina Gigliotti and L.A.L.D.

Art+Text Budapest is delighted to present the second solo exhibition of the young painter, Ádám Dallos. The exhibition titled Sounds from the Shelter presents a selection of dramatic paintings from the series Horses on Riverside alongside with two newer editions of the pink boy nudes from Slaughter Landscapes. Sounds from the riverside, songs from the stable, clatters from the shelter. The mute projections of the inner tornados of the soul, the birth of a new totem animal.

Hyun-Sook Song was born in 1952 and grew up in a mountain village in Korea. In 1972 she travelled to West Germany and soon after that she began to draw and to paint. In doing so she often gave voice to her nostalgic memories of her beloved motherland. Over several decades she created paintings with only a handful of motifs or themes: clay pots, silk ribbons draped around posts, or woven textiles hung on a
thread. 

Darren Bader’s third exhibition at Sadie Coles HQ, more or less, revolves around ideas of exchange, authorship, and the boundaries of the art object. In a series of installations, videos, and texts, Bader extends his use of the found object as a literal and conceptual fulcrum – deploying it as absurdist intervention and index of mundane reality.